Friday, 22 November 2013

Pont Felin Gat in Autumn.

Pont Felin Gat is the woodland alongside the National Botanic Gardens.Whist being a charming place all year round, in autumn, with all its beech trees, it is a very special delight. With the sun shining it was decided to take advantage of the spectacle to have a short foray along the woodland paths.

Fungus species encountered we took to be: A large troop of Stump Puffballs, Lycoperdon  pyriforme, Tiny eyelash fungi, Scutellinia scutellata, Sinuous Chantrelle, Pseudocraterellus undulatus, A crepidotus sp. possibly crepidotus mollis, Buttercap, Rhodocollybia butyracea, Dead Man's Fingers and Candlesnuff Fungus as well as a large troop of Sheathed Woodtuft about 2 metres in length along an old fallen tree-trunk. There was also a Feathered Thorn Moth resting on an oak-tree.

Eyelash fungus, Scutellinia scutellata.
Stump Puffball, Lycoperdon  pyriforme.
 Images of the fungi have been placed in a new "Pont Felin Gat" set on our Flickr site for comment or correction. 
Check it out here

5 comments:

  1. Wow, you found the eyelash fungus. I've never knowlingly seen that before. Given how small it is, is it still possible to say where you found it? I wouldn't mind going to have a look.
    I've seen pestle puffball a couple of times this year - does that make it a good year?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Bruce
    Walking back from the main waterfall to the entrance you will come to that bridge with wooden handrails, cross over and the river is now on your left. Leave the path soon and walk alongside the river for a while and you will come to a fallen log that you could use to cross the river. The Eyelash Fungi is on that log. It is very small but you can see it quite easily.
    Best of Luck.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Found them!! Thank you ever so much Colin - I'd have never found them if you hadn't told me where to look. Yes, very small but tough in texture, and on the same mossy log habitat that elf cups seem to favour in January/February. Great stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Greetings to all, the puffball above looks as if it is growing on wood ----- the only one which grows on wood is Lycoperdon pyriforme = Stump puffball. Pyriforme because it is 'pear-shaped' (if held by it's base). L excipuliforme is somewhat larger. I will enter a picture of this ---- once I get the hang of this technical 'blog'! Philip

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks Philip - I've changed it now. We'll get there in the end!

    ReplyDelete